The Hiding Place in Glenn Beck’s Program, Nov 11th

We have a wonderful opportunity to share the story of Corrie ten Boom with the world. Dr. Michael D. Evans will be New York City next week for an on-air interview with Glenn Beck on Tuesday. He is planning to air “The Hiding Place” on his program on next Friday the 11th. Pray that the message of love and sacrifice to save Jewish people that is found in this movie will spread around the world and touch many hearts. We will be promoting the Ten Boom Museum and the virtual tour as well.

 

Dr. Michael Evans and Glenn Beck shares the same admiration for Corrie Ten Boom’s heroism.

Don’t forget to join the Corrie Ten Boom Museum in Facebook!

In My Father’s House by Corrie Ten Boom

In My Father's House by Corrie Ten Boom Corrie ten Boom was fifty years old when she began harboring Jews during World War II. She was imprisoned in a concentration camp, and after her release she traveled the world, proclaiming the gospel. What happened in those earlier fifty years to prepare Corrie for all that lay ahead?

In My Father’s House (over 250,000 copies sold) explains how God used life’s small beginnings and everyday happenings to prepare Corrie for the suffering and victories to come. The eighth book of the Corrie ten Boom Library, it is the first in the series to focus on the years leading up to World War II and the events of The Hiding Place. More than merely a collection of memories from Corrie’s colorful life, this book explores the human side of one of the most authentic Christian witnesses and the faith that kept her going strong.

Holland’s First Female Watchmaker

Ten Boom was born on April 15, 1892, in Haarlem, in the Netherlands. Before her first birthday, her grandfather died and left his home and watchmaking business, founded in 1837, to her father. The family, which included older sisters Betsie and Nollie, and a brother, Willem, moved into the the ten Boom hiding Place on Barteljorisstraat 19, and her father took over the storefront business below. The family lived in a quirky warren of rooms above the shop over three separate floors, and Corrie Ten Boom, she and her sister Betsie shared a room at the back of the house on a high third floor. During their youth, the household also included three aunts, who helped care for the four ten Boom children.

Like Betsie, ten Boom never married, and eventually joined her father’s watch sales and repair business. She also became the first licensed woman watchmaker in the Netherlands. The family members were devout Christians, active members of the Dutch Reformed church, and ten Boom followed in the footsteps of one of her aunts and participated in several charitable aid projects in Haarlem. The ten Boom home and business served as a hub of activity in their neighborhood, and they regularly provided a meal to beggars and took in foster children. All the local children were especially fond of ten Boom’s pious but genial father, Casper, nicknamed “Opa,” or grandfather.