Interview 1974 by Corrie Ten Boom

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Ten Boom Hiding Place

Extend the 100-Year Prayer Meeting

“God does not have problems. Only plans,” proclaimed Corrie ten Boom when a clerical error allowed her to be released from a Nazi concentration camp one week before all women prisoners her age were executed.

Though she was released from the horror of Ravensbruck concentration camp, Corrie continued to live with a remarkable reliance on God, just as her family had as they hid Jews in the ten Boom hiding Place from Nazi terror. Generations of ten Booms held Christian prayer meetings for Israel for 100 years prior to World War II. Click here to begin our inspirational virtual tour of the ten Boom home.

Traveling the world as an ambassador of the power of forgiveness in Christ, Corrie later established rehabilitation centers to help other Holocaust survivors. Her 1971 autobiography, The Hiding Place, became a movie in 1975, inspiring many to see God at work through the darkest of life’s circumstances. You can preview a portion of this powerful movie within our virtual tour by using the compass to visit location #3.

You can become a part of Corrie’s incredible legacy.

Ten Boom Hid Jews in the Hiding Place

During the Nazi Occupation, the ten Boom family hid Jews, as well as Gentiles who were targeted by the Nazis in the ten Boom hiding place which was built inside Corrie ten Boom’s bedroom. Everything was thought of from outside venting to water, hardtack and vitamins. Those who stayed in the ten Booms’ home ate together, shared in the household chores, read scriptures and prayed together, and even put on plays and evenings of entertainment, celebrating all faiths’ holidays. Although the Jews and other guests slept in spare rooms throughout the house an alarm system had been installed to alert them of danger. This would allow those in hiding a chance to run to the top floor of the long house and slide into the small closet behind a false wall in Corrie’s bedroom.

Eventually Corrie along with other family members was arrested. Corrie spent four months in solitary confinement at a prison and then was transferred with her sister to Ravensbrück. Her sister Betsie died in December of 1944. Corrie was released on a clerical error weeks after her beloved sister’s death. Casper ten Boom died after 10 days in prison. In fact all the family rescuers but Corrie, her nephew Peter, Willem and Nollie died at the hands of the Nazis for their altruistic actions.

Keeping Alive the Corrie ten Boom Tradition of Care

The Jerusalem Prayer Team is a direct outreach of the Corrie ten Boom Fellowship. The family ten Boom started a weekly prayer meeting for the Jewish people in 1844, after a moving worship service in the Dutch Reformed Church of Rev. Witteveen. Willem ten Boom felt the need to pray for the Jewish people, so he started the weekly prayer meeting where the family and others who stopped by specifically prayed for the peace of Jerusalem (Psalm 122:6). These meetings took place every week for one hundred years, until February 28, 1944, when Nazi soldiers came to the house to take them away for helping local Jews and hiding them in a secret room. On that day, the family was together for a Bible study and prayer meeting. Following the tradition of the ten Boom family, Jerusalem Prayer Team continues to pray for the peace of Jerusalem and encourages Christians to exercise their faith by helping the Jewish people — God’s ancient people.

Read more about Corrie ten Boom and the Ten Boom Hiding Place at http://jerusalemprayerteam.org/hidingplace.asp

Keeping Alive the Corrie ten Boom Tradition of Care

Picture The Corrie ten Boom Fellowship and its sister organization, The Corrie ten Boom Foundation of Holland, are also charged with carrying forth the vision of the ten Boom Family. Specifically, that vision is to care for and protect the Jewish people and to pray for the peace of Jerusalem, which was a 100-year weekly tradition in the ten Boom household.

The ten Boom family were devoted Christians who dedicated their lives in service to their fellow man. Their home was always an “open house” for anyone in need. During the Second World War, the ten Boom Hiding Place home became a refuge, a hiding place, for fugitives and those hunted by the Nazis. Like the famed Oscar Schindler, the ten Booms were instrumental in saving nearly 800 Jews from the Nazi death camps, and were imprisoned themselves for their efforts. Life in the camp was almost unbearable, but Corrie and her sister, Betsie, spent their time sharing Jesus’ love with their fellow prisoners. Many women became Christians in that terrible place because of Corrie and Betsie’s witness to them. Four members of the ten Boom family gave their lives for the family’s commitment, but Corrie came home from the death camp. She realized her life was a gift from God, and she needed to share what she and Betsy had learned in Ravensbruck. At age 53, Corrie began a worldwide ministry that took her into more than 60 countries in the next 32 years.
The Jerusalem Prayer Team is a direct outreach of the Corrie ten Boom Fellowship. The family ten Boom started a weekly prayer meeting for the Jewish people in 1844, after a moving worship service in the Dutch Reformed Church of Rev. Witteveen. Willem ten Boom felt the need to pray for the Jewish people, so he started the weekly prayer meeting where the family and others who stopped by specifically prayed for the peace of Jerusalem (Psalm 122:6). These meetings took place every week for one hundred years, until February 28, 1944, when Nazi soldiers came to the house to take them away for helping local Jews and hiding them in a secret room. On that day, the family was together for a Bible study and prayer meeting. Following the tradition of the ten Boom family in the ten Boom Hiding Place, Jerusalem Prayer Team continues to pray for the peace of Jerusalem and encourages Christians to exercise their faith by helping the Jewish people – God’s ancient people.

Oscar Schindler

Oskar Schindler was born on April 28, 1908 at Zwittau/Moravia (today in the Czeck republic).

His middle-class Catholic family belonged to the German-speaking community in the Sudetenland. The young Schindler, who attended German grammar school and studied engineering, was expected to follow in the footsteps of his father and  take charge of the family farm-machinery plant. Some of Schindler’s schoolmates and childhood neighbors were Jews, but with none of them did he develop an intimate or lasting friendship. Like most of the German-speaking youths of the Sudetenland, he subscribed to Konrad Henlein’s Sudeten German Party, which strongly supported the Nazi Germany and actively strove for the dismemberment of Czechoslovakia and their annexation to Germany . When the Sudetenland was incorporated into Nazi Germany in 1938, Schindler became a formal member of the Nazi party.

Shortly after the outbreak of war in September 1939, thirty-one-year-old Schindler showed up in occupied Krakow. The ancient city, home to some 60,000 Jews and seat of the German occupation administration, the Generalgouvernement, proved highly attractive to German entrepreneurs, hoping capitalize on the misfortunes of the subjugated country and make a fortune. Naturally cunning and none too scrupulous, Schindler appeared at first to thrive in these surroundings.  In October 1939, he took over a run-down enamelware factory that had previously belonged to a Jew.  He cleverly maneuvered his steps- acting upon the shrewd commercial advice of a Polish-Jewish accountant, Isaak Stern – and began to build himself a fortune. The small concern in Zablocie outside Krakow, which started producing kitchenware for the German army, began to grow by leaps and bounds. After only three months it already had a task-force of some 250 Polish workers, among them seven Jews. By the end of 1942, it had expanded into a mammoth enamel and ammunitions production plant, occupying some 45,000 square meters and employing almost 800 men and women. Of these, 370 were Jews from the Krakow ghetto, which the Germans had established after they entered the city.

A hedonist and gambler by nature, Schindler soon adopted a profligate lifestyle, carousing into the small hours of the night, hobnobbing with high ranking SS-officers, and philandering with beautiful Polish women. Schindler seemed to be no different from other Germans who had come to Poland as part of the occupation administration and their associates. The only thing that set him apart from other war-profiteers, was his humane treatment of his workers, especially the Jews. Read more…

In 1962 a tree was planted in Schindler’s honor in the Avenue of the Righteous at Yad Vashem. Oskar and Emilie Schindler were recognized as Righteous Among the Nations in 1993.

Just like Oskar and Emilie Schindler, Corrie ten Boom and her family was able to saved countless Jews from the Nazi horror during the war in the hiding place. Israel honored Corrie ten Boom by naming her Righteous Among the Nations for her efforts. Ten Boom…

Devout Christian Family Shelters Jews in WWII

TenBoomFamily

During the Second World War, the ten Boom home became a refuge, a ten Boom hiding place, for fugitives and those hunted by the Nazis. By protecting these people, Casper and his daughters, Corrie and Betsie, risked their lives. This non-violent resistance against the Nazi-oppressors was the ten Boom’s way of living out their Christian faith. This faith led them to hide Jews, students who refused to cooperate with the Nazis, and members of the Dutch “underground” resistance movement. Read more…

The Hiding Place

In 1837, Willem ten Boom opened a Clock Shop in this house. His family lived in the rooms above the shop. The ten Boom family were devoted Christians who dedicated their lives in service to their fellow man. Their home was always an “open house” for anyone in need. Through the decades, the ten Booms were very active in social work in Haarlem, and their faith inspired them to serve the religious community and society at large.

During the Second World War, the ten Boom home became a refuge, a hiding place, for fugitives and those hunted by the Nazis. By protecting these people, Casper and his daughters, Corrie and Betsie, risked their lives. This non-violent resistance against the Nazi-oppressors was the ten Boom’s way of living out their Christian faith. This faith led them to hide Jews, students who refused to cooperate with the Nazis, and members of the Dutch “underground” resistance movement.

During 1943 and into 1944, there were usually 6-7 people illegally living in this home, 4 Jews and 2 or 3 members of the Dutch underground. Additional refugees would stay with the ten Booms for a few hours or a few days until another “safe house” could be located for them. Corrie became a ringleader within the network of the Haarlem underground. Corrie and “the Beje group” would search for courageous Dutch families who would take in refugees, and much of Corrie’s time was spent caring for these people once they were in hiding.

Read more about the ten Boom hiding place at the Jerusalem Prayer Team website.

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